SLP Chat

This will be a place where therapists can share ideas, problem solve and express concerns.  Lets work together to make our jobs easier!

Teresa

Buzzword Book Give-a-way

Posted by on Jun 17, 2015 in Administrators Page, slider, SLP Chat | 0 comments

Buzzword Book Give-a-way

Hearing about which buzzwords bother you the most was a lot of fun. Every single one of the words submitted were irritating in their own unique way. I chose two that I thought were the best worse buzzwords.

The first buzz word selected was submitted by Patricia. Her word was “rigor” and for the obvious reason, it makes Pat think of death. I have to admit I also flash to an episode of Law and Order, with the pathologist saying, “TheThe body was in full rigor” every time I hear that word used in school. If they are going to use the word ‘rigor” in education why just use the word “rigorous” it makes more sense.

dictionary.com lists the following meanings for the word “rigor”

noun
1. Strictness, severity, or harshness, as in dealing with people.
2. The full or extreme severity of laws, rules, etc.
3. Severity of living conditions; hardship; austerity:
The rigor of wartime existence.
4. A severe or harsh act, circumstance, etc.
5. Scrupulous or inflexible accuracy or adherence:
The logical rigor of mathematics.
6. Severity of weather or climate or an instance of this:
The rigors of winter.
7. Pathology. A sudden coldness, as that preceding certain fevers; chill.
8. Physiology. A state of rigidity in muscle tissues during which they are unable to respond to stimuli due to the coagulation of muscle protein.
9. Obsolete. stiffness or rigidity.

The synonyms listed for ‘rigor” are even worse
inflexibility, stringency. cruelty (these are 3 words I always like to associate with education)

I understand rigorous curriculum (don’t like it but I get it) but I started thinking this word must mean something else in education. After a little research I found this page in The Glossary of Educational Reform defining “rigor”. Basically Educational Reform has redefined the word and made it way more confusing. I predict this buzz word will quit buzzing in a few years unless Webster’s adds it maybe as a new slang in 2016.

Kim suggested the word “Modify.” I chose “modify” because of her reason for disliking “modify” and because of my own personal experiences with this buzz word. Kim wrote, “Modify in theory is fabulous. However, in practice this buzz word often lacks depth in its application, is laden with inconsistency & often does not live up to its full intended potential.” Couldn’t have said it better myself. We write and suggest modifications all the time but who is responsible for modifications and who monitors them is a whole other story.

“Modify” became a big buzz right after “RTI” (response to intervention-a buzz word in itself and worthy of its own article) came into play. I remember the confusion between Modifications and Accommodations. I also remember our team leader having to present several times on the differences between the two. If I had to sit through that lecture one more time I might have started pulling my hair out. Now another buzz word submitted was “differentiated instructions” which in my mind is the same as modifications (but I bet it isn’t). I tried looking it up in that glossary mentioned above but it wasn’t there.

The other buzz words mention also deserve comment as runners-up.

Kudos-Yeah that gets said a lot. It’s one of those word that if you hear too much there is usually something wrong or something being nervously covered up. It ranks right up there with everyone talking about how nice, cute or sweet a child it. In meetings that’s code for you have a child who has something going on.

Servicing-I think I might be guilty of this one but not with parents just with staff. As Shannon suggests, this is a word that gets misused. “We are not “servicing” children, we provide a service. Sheesh- sounds like we are changing a transmission, not providing speech therapy!” to quote Shannon.

Using “no longer eligible” rather than “dismissing” from therapy is another one that makes us sound high faulting to parents. I think it must be in the team leader training because students have to be eligible for services. I think they are taught to use that word. However, there are some situations where that language might need to be used because most of our language students will never develop strong language skills.

Pre-determining Services-This was actually a very good one that leads to another question. Why are school SLP’s in many areas not allowed to diagnose or recommend specific direct speech and language services in their reports? It’s frustrating that a lot of the time the expertise of the school based SLP is not respected, welcomed or even considered when determining programming. (I’m keeping this one for a future article.)

Thank you all for your submissions. Patricia and Kim will be receiving copies of my book.The School Speech LanScreen Shot 2015-04-04 at 3.52.05 PMguage Pathologist, An administrators guide to understanding the role of the SLP in schools along with strategies to aid staffing, workload management and student success.

Keep the buzz word coming. Some are just so absurd. Luckily we don’t have to listen to many for long since they come and go so quickly.

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Buzz Words in Education

Posted by on Jun 7, 2015 in Administrators Page, Parent Information, slider, SLP Chat | 1 comment

Buzz Words in Education

In the field of education buzz words come and go quickly. Current buzz words in education usually reflect the trend of the week and saturate conferences, school meetings, program development, scholarly articles, blog posts, social media and even lunchroom conversation for short periods of time. After working in education for so many years, it is difficult to take any new or even recycled buzz word seriously. Reality is most buzz words in education don’t buzz for long and are quickly replaced with a new flavor of the day.

The buzz word I dislike the most has been around forever. It’s only been the past 10 years or so that this word has taken on a negative connotation for me. The buzz word I have grown to dislike is STRATEGY. This was a perfectly good word until it became overused in education.

Now I am not recommending we stop using and suggesting strategies all together. We need to suggest them and kids need to have a set of strategies to use. However, based on meetings I’ve attended over the past several years, in a variety of educational settings, it appears that somehow educators have gotten it into their heads that if we put enough strategies in place, learning and development emerges. We all know strategies can help but the overuse of the term strategies leads one to believe that strategies can replace learning.

Strategies generated can be very vague, somewhat vague, fairly concrete or solid. What defines a special strategy? Are strategies that special or just best practices repackaged. Does a strategy involve direct or indirect intervention? How can you really measure a strategy’s success. Do you need a baseline? Who should be suggesting/approving strategies? Who monitors strategies? Who teaches strategies? Why are so many kids needing so many strategies? So many questions come to mind.
Rather than teaching the deficit or missing skills, “strategies” are put into place. Most strategies (initially suggested) are very superficial and do not increase direct time or effort with the student. Many students often remain in “strategy mode” for years.

Strategy, as a buzz word has become too broad and thats why it bothers me. Everything we try in schools has become a strategy. I would like to see this word used a little less and strategies in schools become a more defined.

What buzz word bothers/bothered you the most or what buzz word do you find the most humorous/useless?

Check out my Facebook page for a giveaway of my new book when you tell me your most bothersome Buzz Word in education.

Related Article

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Therapy Hot Spot Review

Posted by on May 25, 2015 in Parent Information, slider, SLP Chat | 0 comments

Therapy Hot Spot Review

I recently came across this new service/product and fell in love with the concept. Therapy Hot Spot is a relatively new business that puts together monthly therapy kits based on the needs of your current caseload.
Wendy Underwood OTA/L is the owner and brains behind this idea. Wendy and her staff create therapy boxes for PTs, PTAs, OTs, COTAs, SLPs, SLPAs and parents. After having you fill out a questionnaire and personally speaking with you, a “therapy box” is filled with materials and suggestions that target your needs and the needs of your students.

 

I reviewed a sample kit and found a variety of items that could tackle general speech and language related concepts and student needs. The box was easily portable and sturdy. I don’t know about you but my workload is bursting at the seams. I often miss my planning time for other workload activities. If Therapy Hot Spot can save me a little time hunting, gathering and creating therapy activities it would be well worth the fee.
Wendy has promised me a tailored kit in the near future. I’m so looking forward to using her items with my specific students. Now my caseload it huge and very diverse so I’m not expecting her to send the perfect activity for every student but we’ll see. However, a good SLP should be able to use their therapeutic skills to take just about any activity and modify that activity to match the needs of their students.
My thoughts are that Therapy Hot Spot boxes would work well in both clinical and school settings. Therapy Hot Spot is defiantly worth a peek online and serious consideration, especially for those who find their planning time disappearing into the abyss.
For specifics and fees please visit their website http://therapyhotspot.com

IMG_1650

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Play, It’s more important than you think

Posted by on May 15, 2015 in Parent Information, slider, SLP Chat | 0 comments

Play, It’s more important than you think

I ran across this fun article floating around Facebook.  33 Activities for Kids That Cost Under $10 Dollars.  Some of these activities looked like a lot of fun.  While the examples they show look a little too “neat” to be done by kids, with some of the activities you can hand them the materials they need and step back.  As a matter of fact it might be a good idea to let them develop their own style of play with their friends.  The amount of learning, experimentation and problem solving the kids can do on their own is amazing if you let them try before swooping in to help.

Take a look at the tin foil and hose experiment, what is the worse that could happen.  First they could actually learn how to rip foil from the role or they could get a small cut in the process.  They could learn how to control or roll up a hose when the were done.  Don’t worry it is still OK to drink from a hose once in awhile.  Have you done it lately, it is still a fun thing to do. Little Jack 1

Several years ago I wrote an article called Play Skills Are More Important Than You Think. With all the changes in our society and education today, emphasis on play has gone by the wayside.  The developmental experts are not promoting PLAY the way they use to.  I seem to remember much of my initial education in college, focused on the different stages of play.  Anyone else ever heard of Piaget?

I hope all kids get to have some fun over the summer, play with their friends, learn the art of problem solving and become creative on their own.

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Introducing My First Book!

Posted by on May 9, 2015 in Administrators Page, slider, SLP Chat | 0 comments

Introducing My First Book!

Today I want to introduce my first book!

 

The School Speech Language Pathologist
An Administrator’s Guide
to understanding the role of the SLP in schools
along with strategies to aid staffing, workload
management and student success.

 

 

I wrote The School Speech Language Pathologist to help demystify and define the role of the Speech Language Pathologist in the school setting. The concrete suggestions provided in this book will help to foster more productive speech and language services, aid caseload management, aid student success and guide program development in schools.

The role of the Speech Language Pathologist in the schools is diverse and crosses both medical and educational disciplines. SLPs are developmental experts and have to know how to address the needs of clients from birth to adulthood. Speech and language development is extremely complicated, sequential and neurologically based. For most children speech and language skills are acquired in a typical naturalistic manner and fall within an expected range of development. For those students who demonstrate developmental language disabilities, moderate/severe language disabilities or learning disabilities, school can be especially challenging, confusing, frustrating and just plain difficult.

Speech and language skills are also life skills. Without strong language abilities, students will struggle to succeed in college and in the work place. Poor language abilities and decreased understanding can even effect personal relationships.

Over the past 30 years the role of the Speech Language Pathologist in the schools has evolved. Growing special needs populations, changing curriculums and needed legislation has created larger caseloads and workloads for Speech Language Pathologists without significant changes in staffing levels. We are no longer just articulation experts. Our scope of practice in the areas of language and learning disabilities goes far beyond what most people think.

Thank You for your interest in learning more about speech and language skills and services in schools. It’s a short read but full of good ideas. Pick it up on the Amazon Link or through Booklocker. Link for the ebook coming soon.

Teresa

***To read and excerpt and to buy the ebook version go to Booklocker.

Professional Liability for SLPs

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A New Book By Ken Robinson

Posted by on Apr 23, 2015 in Administrators Page, slider, SLP Chat | 0 comments

A New Book By Ken Robinson

This past week I saw an interview with Ken Robinson promoting his new book “Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education”

Ken Robinson is a speaker and author I’ve been following for several years now. Back in 2012 I reviewed an article interviewing Sir Ken in of all places the Costco magazine.  http://www.theschoolspeechtherapist.com/sir-ken-robinson-calls-for-a-revolution-in-education/

As soon as I get a chance I will be reading and reviewing his new book.   The reviews look good and I’m sure what he has to say is right on the money.

Sir Ken also gives some pretty rousing ted talks

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CELF-5 Results?

Posted by on Mar 14, 2015 in slider, SLP Chat | 3 comments

CELF-5 Results?

Sorry it’s been so long since you’ve heard from me. I have another project in the works which I am sure most of the school based SLPs will either be thrilled with or at least agree with. With any luck at all I will be able to announce that project before the end of March.

So yesterday I received and interesting question about the CELF-5 from Dawn, an SLP in the mid-west. Apparently many of the therapists in her district are finding kids are no longer qualifying on the new CELF-5. She was wondering if anyone else having this same experience?

I don’t think I’m seeing this and I’ve given the CELF-5 at least 30 times. However, thinking about it I’m wondering if our “fence kids” are doing a little better than expected. That might not be a bad thing. Now, looking at my testing procedures I always give supplementary testing. I believe vocabulary testing speaks volumes. For my older elementary I might perform the TAPS or TOPS my older students will always get the CELF-metalinguistics (the old TLC). I will seek out other evaluation tools if necessary but these are my standards.  I always talk to teachers, special educators and parents before testing if I can. I doubt all therapists have the luxury of doing additional testing and opt for a battery only instead. Because I give additional testing my writing almost always shifts to after hours. Time factors make it difficult to write a coherent and complete report or document at work.  [amazon template=iframe image&asin=[amazon template=iframe image&asin=[amazon template=iframe image&asin=​​​

What’s your thoughts on the question. Are fewer of your students qualifying on scores from the CELF-5?

T.

CELF-5 First Impression

Q-global and the CELF-5

FYI…Still not totally thrilled with the Q-global scoring, are you?

 

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Speech Language Pathology Gifts?

Posted by on Jan 19, 2015 in pictures, slider, SLP Chat | 2 comments

Speech Language Pathology Gifts?

Did you know that Amazon carries a variety of Speech Therapy gifts/Speech Language Pathology gifts. I guess if you went to ASHA you might have seen some of these odd little trinkets. Some are rather cute and some are a little freaky. I love my job but you would have to live a Speech Language Pathology lifestyle to use some of them. I could put links to over 229 items. I’m just going to pick out a few for fun.

“What the he-double hockey sticks is it?” People will be afraid to ask

A little creepy

My tree felt empty without this

This will leave the other guys asking, “Where can I get one?”

If I want to keep the kids and my husband away from my car, I’ll put this on it

Doesn’t Advanced Health Care usually give this stuff away?

Think I could use this to carry my wine to school?

This is rather cute but should it be Speech Language Pathologist instead?

I just hope my family doesn’t find this page on Amazon. If they did I could only imagine my birthday and Christmas gifts for the rest of my life. Come to think of it we use to get my Mother all kinds of nursing trinkets. What were we thinking?

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How SLPs can deal with Middle School rudeness

Posted by on Jan 19, 2015 in Parent Information, slider, SLP Chat, Your Middle Schooler: A Unique Age | 0 comments

How SLPs can deal with Middle School rudeness

I received a question from a middle school therapist asking if I had any suggestions on how to deal with rude disrespectful students. No other information than that in terms of community, severity of students, size of groups or gender. From my 15 plus years of experience at the middle school level I think I relate to the situation she might be in. I’m going to assume her students are mainly boys and basically language/learning disabled students.

Three things to consider. First, Speech Language Pathologists do not also have to be experts in behavior. We have enough on our plate. Second, the rules have changed just in the past few years and we are not always allowed to use our professional judgement on who will continue to benefit from therapy and who will not. Third, middle schoolers specialize in rudeness, but it shouldn’t be consistent.

As few as 5 years ago I was able to go into a middle school annual review meeting, explain any behavioral difficulties that might be going on. I would proceed to tell the parent that the student isn’t working in therapy and not really getting anything out of it. Parents usually realized the issue because they were dealing with similar behaviors or complaints at home. We kept any language accommodations and modifications in place but the student was officially discharged from therapy. These days students have to “test out” of therapy before they can be discharged. We all know that “testing out” rarely happens for our language kids. Hence our professional judgement is ignored by the system. However, at least at a 3 year reevaluation you can bring up concerns around not continuing to benefit from services.

They are middle school aged children and figure if they keep behaving badly they eventually won’t have to go to therapy. Keep in mind that these children are probably having considerable difficulty in middle school as the language demands in all subjects quickly becomes more difficult. Going to therapy isn’t cool. I’ve been fortunate to work in schools for the past 20 or so years that have been on the cutting edge of integration services. Most kids accept each other and do not pay much attention to the limitations of typical language/learning disabled students. You might want to consider your schools history in terms of special education integration.

I use to be able to tempt the students with food treats once in a while. However, that was before all the food rules schools now have. A granola bar, cookies, dum dum pops or a stick of gum went a long way. By feeding them it showed I cared. It was something special to look forward to and most middle schoolers are hungry all the time.

Some middle school students that were embarrassed to be in speech therapy, especially if someone had the bight idea for me to see them in the classroom.  Rudeness could be the result of embarrassment.

If you think you students are embarrassed about having to go to therapy here are some suggestions.

  • Talk to them about therapy, what they are working on, who made the decision that they would have to see you (yes include parents), try to do pull out therapy whenever possible. Polling my middle school students over the years, few wanted me breathing down their necks, in the classroom with their friends watching.
  • Spend time working gently on raising awareness of their language needs
  • Don’t label your door if you don’t have to. If you do just put your name.
  • I think all therapy rooms should have windows in their doors but make the student’s seat placement outside the view of the window so their friends don’t see them.
  • Explain any scheduling decisions
  • Don’t show up at the classroom door to pick them up, make a phone call to class instead.

Here are some other suggestions you might try

  • If the groups aren’t working try changing them up (I realize that is easier said than done because our scheduling is based on the school schedule). Are your groups too big to manage?
  • Try changing your therapy methods to make activities more fun. Throw in a game once in a while, even if it is a game that has little to no educational value.
  • Laugh with your students. I created a joke curriculum that focused on many aspects of ambiguous and figurative language along with vocabulary.
  • Occasionally give them a day off, especially if there is something going on in class that they want to be part of. Cut session short once in awhile, they like that. (this of course depends how strict your administration is on comp services)
  • Be firm, make it clear that you are tired of their rudeness. It’s ok to use your mean teacher voice when necessary. Follow up with an activity that they like then thank them for their cooperation or tell them this was a fun group.
  • Occasionally bring in classwork and let them finish homework, help them muddle through a book they’re reading.
  • Design some activities where they can get up and move around. A white board comes in very handy for this.

If these suggestions don’t have any effect, its time to bring your issues to the principal or vice principal. It might be a good issue to pose to teachers at staff meeting. Teachers and counsellors might be able to provide some insight or even support. At the very least you’ll find out if this is a general school issue or individual specific. More than likely these kids are rude everywhere not just in therapy.

As mentioned earlier middle schoolers specialize in rudeness. Our language disabled students have difficulty knowing when it might be ok to be rude and when it isn’t. Most middle schoolers will not be blatantly rude to adults other than their parents but it does happen. Keep in mind they’re a bundle full of hormones and sometimes can’t help it. Rudeness shouldn’t happen on a consistent basis. If you see a problem try talking privately to the student about it or if you know there are issues mention it to the guidance counsellors/school psychologists.

Middle School Therapists, please feel free to add any additional suggestions

Good Luck

Professional Liability for SLPs
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